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(@therealmrtall)
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How much tuning do you perform yourself and when do you take your skis into the shop? Personally, I wax my own skis (although I do it less often than I should), but tuning the edges has always seemed like a specialty task suited for the shop.

REI has a decent video on basic edge tuning -- removing rust and burrs -- that seems simple to follow for a neophyte like me: REI: How to Tune Ski Edges - Remove Burrs and Rust. However, they suggest the shop is the best place for more extensive work. I'd love to do more tuning myself, including full edge tunes. Technique seems to be inconsistent across numerous videos on the subject (i.e., some use just a few tools/files, others a whole range, etc).

Questions about edge tuning:

  • How often should you do it?
  • When do you decide that you should take your skis into the shop?
  • Recommended resources?

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(@geepers)
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Hi Marcus,

There was another thread on tuning that had good info.

https://skierlab.com/community/gear-gossip/my-tuning-tips/

(Not my tuning tips - James' and Adrian's tips )

Re your questions:

1. Wax my skis about every 3 days or sooner if I have a rest day. Will touch up the edges at the same time - if they need it. Which largely depends on the conditions. Diamond stone any burs and run a guided file down the edges.

2. Skied 7 weeks in the soft soft in interior BC and didn't need to take them to the shop. Skied 1 day back in Australia and the edges were trashed- we had a poor season this year and unfortunately a lot of hidden rocks. That 1st day was brutal. Granite vs French steel is no contest and when carving a rock strike makes short work of the entire length of an edge. The damage was beyond me so that required a full base grind, edging and re-texturing. Not cheap. Conditions improved a little as the season progressed but I'll get another shop job done before next season as it's again beyond my basic tuning skills and equipment.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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Hi Marcus,

I agree with geepers that how often depends on conditions, but I take the view that regular maintenance will keep things running well and will stop you having to take lots of edge material off. There's really a lot you can do yourself if you have a few decent pieces of equipment. Have a look at the thread geepers referenced.

My feeling is that on the whole I can do a far better job than most shops will do. It's unlikely a shop will invest their full attention to your skis when there are numerous pairs to work on.

An interesting anecdote was last year my wife was having a new pair of boots fitted and while she was walking around in them, I was chatting to the fitter in his workshop. He was servicing a number of skis. Everything was machine, machine and wax bath for the waxing. Then he started on his daughter's race skis, the hand tools came out and the wax was dripped and ironed as you would do at home.

There's some really good youtube stuff out there but also some bad advice so be careful.

 


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(@skierjohan)
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After the season, I usually send my ski to sanding, edge tuning, and basic hotwaxing.
So, when I receive my ski, new sole layer and kinda hot waxed and sole is refreshed.
Therefore, I hot wax warm temperature base 3-5 times, mid temperature for same, cold temperature same. Then, skiing hot wax is 3-5 times depends on the temperature.
During skiing season, I can ski everyday, but due to I have good base to protect and how much skiing I do, and also it pendsw on the snow conditions.  If it's cold days, I won't wax my ski for maybe 3-4 days? If it's like spring, I might wax everyday.
You may try this one to put in your pocket, and simply put it after lunch for example.
removed link
To conclude, I am not an expert tuner, so if you feel your ski doesn't work for the snow, then you wax it for sure.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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skierhiroshisan do you do your own work on your edges. If so, how often. I try and avoid a file as much as possible and keep on top of the edges using diamond stones from 100 to 400 then 600 and finish with an Arkansas stone.


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(@geepers)
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One point in home tuning which seems fairly obvious....

Perhaps best to use something other than your premium carving skis the 1st few times. Start with an older set but not so old the difference can't be appreciated. Once you find that the tuning is improving the skis then you'll be more confident working your #1 pair.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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There's a ski tuning Zoom presentation on Wednesday 17th for CSIA members. I'll be tuning in even though it'll be early hours of Thursday for me.


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(@therealmrtall)
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@adrian_hamilton I tried to join the Zoom meeting, but it had reached capacity of 100 people. I'll check their website for some content. Would have been nice for the live workshop however.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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@therealmrtall it's just finished and they apologised for the problem so will run another one for those who couldn't get on. It's 1.50 a.m. here so time for bed.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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@therealmrtall I just got notification that there's another one next Wednesday for those who missed out yesterday.


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(@therealmrtall)
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Posted by: @adrian_hamilton

@therealmrtall I just got notification that there's another one next Wednesday for those who missed out yesterday.

Awesome. Just checked my email and the note is sitting in my Inbox.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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@therealmrtall I don't know how much tuning you do yourself but there wasn't really anything I found new in the presentation. It was good to have a bit of a refresher and the CSIA discount may be of interest to you in Canada, though not to me in the UK. Looking at the website their tools and waxes seem rather expensive.


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(@geepers)
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Couldn't make it yesterday. Will try for the re-run if possible. Think they said should get 500 participants on a Zoom call.

Although the Australian Snowy Mountains granite keeps giving me tuning problems beyond the capabilities of the few home tools available. Hoping for a better season this southern winter.


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(@therealmrtall)
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Posted by: @adrian_hamilton

@therealmrtall I don't know how much tuning you do yourself but there wasn't really anything I found new in the presentation.

I'm only really confident with waxing myself. I haven't tackled edges. I'd like to tackle maintenance of my edges -- i.e., remove any burrs or light rust -- and take my gear to the local shop for more full-tune type applications. It would be ideal to attend an in-person hands-on workshop to get beyond the basics.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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@therealmrtall I would say it'll be interesting then. You should get started. It's not particularly difficult. I'm not a DIY person in any way but I've been doing my own skis for years and don't trust others with them with very few exceptions.

It sounds like their website has a number of 'how to' videos and there are lots of good ones on YouTube, though be careful as there are also some terrible ones. I would stick to reputable people and authorised technicians.


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