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the question about the custom footbed

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(@rookie)
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Hello 

I would like to know how to choose the correctly fabricated footbed. 
Anyone could teach me how to choose the correctly fabricated footbed.

By the way,I have some question about the footbed as bellows.
1.Should  the front of the footbed  be very thin? the back of the footbed should be thick?
2.Should the base of the footbed  be very flat?
3.Should the footbed for ski boots be very stiff or flexible?
4.What is my footbed’s problem?

Here's the picture of my custom footbed.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/138142261@N03/24978541177/in/dateposted-public/


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(@geepers)
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My two cents worth...

Footbeds (and boots) best dealt with by a boot fit specialist. There's likely that there will be features of your anatomy that will affect what is required.

For example my ankles over-pronate when I bend forward at the knees. To counter that my footbeds have high, strong arch support - otherwise my ankle bone presses hard on the inward side of the boot. I used to ski with a lot of boot pain until that got sorted. Another personal 'feature' is that one leg is slightly shorter than the other (from a broken leg long ago, not ski related). So the fitter added a small pad to the base of the footpad on that short side.

It's been my experience that boots should fit firmly - to help control the ski - but without mind numbing pain. Correctly fitted boots with good quality footbeds, done by some-one who knows what they are doing, can make a world of difference to ski skills and enjoyment. Worth spending time and money to get stuff that works for you.

 

 


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(@skinerd)
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There are a few different schools of thought regarding footbeds, so I don’t think there are clear right or wrong answers to your questions. I’ll try to invite a few bootfitters I know to see if they might be willing to join these forums... and then battle it out!

Some fitters think the footbed should be posted to secure the foot in a subtalor joint neutral position while others insist it should never be posted as that would restrict functional movement.

Personally, I think some posting is probably fine if your foot needs correcting (I experiment with this quite a bit as I have one foot that over pronates while the other doesn't) but it should be flexible enough through the arch to be able to evert the foot with ease. This is the expertise of podiatrists though so I wouldn’t take my word for it. 

 


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(@rookie)
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Hi geepers and Skinerd,

Thank you very much for your reply and sharing.
I always think it is very difficult to find a good boot fitter that knows functional anatomy and how it is applied for the boot fitting.I hope I could buy a good pair of ski boots in big white ski resort in March this year.


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(@geepers)
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Hi Taketo,

If you are in Big White best to see Lindsay at Dizzy's Ski and Board Shop. It's the only ski and boot sales shop in the resort and he owns/runs the place so you will not have any trouble finding him. Lindsay is the boot fitting guru and does a very good job training his team. Fitted my wife's new boots last season and they are working very well. He also helped my boot fit with a couple of adjustments last season.

I've skied Big White the past 2 seasons - great snow and I do really love that place. Not the steepest terrain (although The Cliff runs are true dbl black) however the tree skiing is superb. (In the trees, please take a buddy and a whistle!) BW currently over 2 meter base so you are going to have great fun. 🙂


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(@geepers)
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Posted by: Skinerd

but it should be flexible enough through the arch to be able to evert the foot with ease. 

Hi skinerd, can you add a little more explanation on this?

I'm picturing the ankle/foot enclosed in the boot with not a lot of room to actually move. Of course we can attempt to move the foot which does something to the center of pressure.

In any case I'm curious as I'm not consciously aware what my ankles/feet are doing / should be doing.


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(@skinerd)
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Posted by: geepers
Posted by: Skinerd

but it should be flexible enough through the arch to be able to evert the foot with ease. 

Hi skinerd, can you add a little more explanation on this?

I'm picturing the ankle/foot enclosed in the boot with not a lot of room to actually move. Of course we can attempt to move the foot which does something to the center of pressure.

In any case I'm curious as I'm not consciously aware what my ankles/feet are doing / should be doing.

If the boot completely immobilizes the foot then it cannot function which I believe forces all the initial tipping movement to come from the femur further up the chain. If you have enough room to evert (or roll the foot inward inside the boot) then it will move the ankle bones closer to the edge allowing for quicker, more precise lateral movement and a better ability to grip.


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(@rookie)
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Hi geepers ,

Thank you for your information about Big White. ? 
What you said is very attractive to me.
I am really looking forward to skiing in Big White ski resort.
I would like to buy a new pair of  ski boots at Dizzy's Ski and Board Shop.

 


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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It seems there are people who are symmetrical and aligned well who could basically put a boot on from the shelf and ski perfectly well supported. They would probably be ok with an off the shelf footbed. These people are very fortunate in my opinion. I believe Marcel Hirscher is in this group.

Speaking as someone with terrible alignment, including a measured 23.9 degrees of tibial torsion in my lower right leg, finding footbeds that are even close to the right thing is a nightmare. It's very expensive, bootfitters over here in England don't really seem to take on or truly understand the problem (or at least the ones I've used) and the outcome has never been satisfactory.

The more I read and listen to the various experts, the more complex and bewildering it becomes and quite frankly beyond the resources of most of us. I don't really know what the answer is.


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(@geepers)
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Posted by: Skinerd

 

If the boot completely immobilizes the foot then it cannot function which I believe forces all the initial tipping movement to come from the femur further up the chain. If you have enough room to evert (or roll the foot inward inside the boot) then it will move the ankle bones closer to the edge allowing for quicker, more precise lateral movement and a better ability to grip.

Well that one had me taking boots out of the bag and trying them on in the Australian heat. And... doesn't seem to be a lot of room to do anything with the feet in terms of everting.

Have to see if I understand bettter on snow - 3 weeks to go!

 


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(@geepers)
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Hi Adrian,

Was just wondering how that torsional twist manifested itself in your skiing. For example does it make it harder or easier to initiate turns in one direction over the other?

I assume surgical correction is not very appealing. Is it possible to mitigate by placing the ski binding partly across the ski? 


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(@rookie)
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Recently I tried to understand what  kind of criteria  a good custom ski footbed should meet.
But it  is too complicated,and it is beyond my imagination and ability.
Not just the custom footbed....too much stuff are needed to be considered together,including the feet measurements.......etc. ? 

Some criteria could be used to check for your footbed when we only consider about the footbed:
The base of the footbed should be flat after grinding the posting.

Why?
If there is no posting in the inside of the footbed,your feet will tend to be pronated.
If there is no posting in the outside of the footbed,your feet will tend to be supinated.
These problems are produced because the footbed doesn't keep the ankle closer to neutral.It will cause some problems during skiing,like edge hold,and releasing.
But it seems someone can ski well with the poor custom ski footbed.Why??
      


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(@geepers)
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Posted by: Taketo

But it seems someone can ski well with the poor custom ski footbed.Why??
      

 

Maybe it's a case of ability overcoming equipment shortcoming. Or not skiing precisely enough to realise the difference. 

For example, a good skier can make good turns on beginner skis. They wouldn't give a personal best time on a race course but would be ok for some medium speed turns on a soft groomer.

As the skier requires improved performance, more precision, more comfort, more endurance then even small improvements in equipment become increasingly important.

Have a look at some CSIAAMSC video clips of skiing in the 60's. They did a passably good job with the skiing and I'm pretty sure those boots of the time did not not have foot beds. 


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(@rookie)
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(@rookie)
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Hi skinerd,

It seems that your custom ski footbed has less posting material below the foot arch when I watched the video"Piste to Peak Ski Performance Series"
If there is no enough posting below the foot arch,it will be not easy to keep the edge hold,and it is also difficult to release the edge before the next turn.
But it seems that it didn't affect you any more,and why? It depends on skills?


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