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(@skinerd)
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To be honest, I find it easier to grip with less posting material as I can roll (evert) the ankle easier. The main reason I've experimented with posting is an attempt to find symmetry between my two very different feet...

...I can't say I've found it. 


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(@rookie)
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Posted by: Skinerd

To be honest, I find it easier to grip with less posting material as I can roll (evert) the ankle easier.

Hi Skinerd,

Thank you very much for your reply.
I couldn't understand why it is easier.I think I need more knowledge about skiing ,boots,and footbed,etc.And I am becoming ski geek. ?


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(@moto)
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My eyes are burning and smoke is coming out of my ears. Lol. Hey Yall how is everyone. My take is the footbed should always hold the foot in a neutral position. A boot should be snug enough that your foot doesnt move in it correct? 


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(@dr-kim)
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@moto Absolutely NOT. The foot should be able to pronate to tip the ski. Too rigid footbeds impair for pronation and impair tipping and edging.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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@dr-kim some seriously good skiers are experimenting with no footbeds at all. I guess it ' necessitates some serious work on strengthening the structures of the foot and it's not something that everyone could or would want to try but it's interesting to hear the feedback.


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(@dr-kim)
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Adrian, that is a surprise to me. Many of us gave up footbeds years ago. On the race circuit not many are using footbeds, just heel cups to control heel displacement and allow forefoot freedom to pronate and supinate. No one has ever been able to convince me that a rigid foot is functionally effective. I am quite efficient and comfortable using a flat insert. Try it for a while.  


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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@dr-kim I have doubts as to whether I could as I have a significant tibial torsion causing a misalignment of nearly 24 degrees. It's always been a struggle to access the inside edge of my right ski. I ma be misunderstanding things but I think that would make my issue all the more problematical.

 


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(@dr-kim)
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Adrian, is your tibial torsion associated w/ bowing of your legs. Foot beds often worsen that situation by inhibiting pronation removed link This is pure conjecture on my part but as an orthopedic surgeon I see lots of different ski/leg problems. 


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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@dr-kim no Kim it doesn't manifest itself like that. Obviously you are an expert and would understand the technicalities but what I experience is that I walk very much on the outside of my right foot and I don't really have much contact with the floor and the head of the first metatarsal.

In my skiing, looking back at very old video, there is a massive 'A' frame as this was how I was getting access to my inside edge. In the early 90s I started using footbeds which definitely helped the situation but even now it's an issue.

I have had associated knee pain and have undertaken a lot of work physically to try and alleviate the problem as best I can. I am able to ski without a really obvious 'A' frame now but frankly always feel disadvantaged. I have limited medial rotation of the right femur, which I am guessing is the result of 63 years misalignment, but have been told by a physio that the inhibition seems to be soft tissue related so I do a lot of work to try and improve this which has had some positive effect.

I'm always open to ideas and would definitely be interested to see if dispensing with footbeds would help, though I wouldn't know which heel cup to buy.

It's really interesting that you were so unsurprised about skiers not using footbeds. I don't know whether we just don't have the bootfitting expertise in the UK. I put the question to a guy who many consider to be the boot guru here in England in an online discussion and he just dismissed it saying you just have to have a footbed of some kind. He wouldn't address the fact that I was quoting a very prominent skier and ski educator who doesn't use them.


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(@sandrap)
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Hello, thought I’d weigh in here for what its worth.  I used to get horrible foot cramps while skiing.  This Christmas I treated myself to custom footbeds (out of desperation) from a reputable boot-fitter. I’ve skied with them 15 days so far, and haven’t had one cramp.  So for me...custom footbeds rock!


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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@sandrap that's the outcome you need. Good to have you here in the group. Look forward to hearing more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

n


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