Notifications
Clear all

Gliding vs Direction Change  

  RSS

(@skinerd)
Estimable Member Admin
Section 8 Coach
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 170
29/03/2020 5:36 am  

Interesting first vid from Warren:


Quote
(@adrian_hamilton)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 179
29/03/2020 10:37 am  

I particularly like the idea of distinguishing the skiing from the skier as well.

For someone who doesn't have the good fortune to ski more than maybe 25 days max in a season, I find the visualisation idea very interesting and appealing. I find it really difficult to do but have set it as one of my goals during lockdown. I'm reading a book by Dr.Jim Taylor and hope to use his information to make it part of my regular training as much as physical preparation.


ReplyQuote
(@geepers)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 171
29/03/2020 8:55 pm  

Will be interesting to see this vid series roll out - must have been a real pita to be injured before Interski.

Also... on visualisation. The 1st thing is knowing what is "correct". The 2nd is knowing when we're actually doing that rather than think we are. Always a challenge and that's what makes it so satisfying for even the smallest improvements. 😀


ReplyQuote
(@adrian_hamilton)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 179
29/03/2020 9:03 pm  

I have realised watching the video again that he doesn't refer to visualisation in it, it's in his Facebook post to launch the video.

We met him at the top of the Great Divide chair, Sunshine Village, when we were doing a bumps clinic with Heather Robertson. It was only 2 or 3 days before his accident.


ReplyQuote
(@adrian_hamilton)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 179
29/03/2020 9:18 pm  

It occurred to me that the term turning is so familiar to those of us who have been skiing for a long time that we just use it and don't think much about what it conveys to others and particularly early learners. 

Is turning used generally to mean just a change of direction or is it a more significant term in peoples' vocabulary. I don't know but I will certainly think about it.

I was quite scathing when BASI started to use the term curve and thought it a bit silly and unnecessary but maybe it's actually a better way of conveying what we're actually doing and easier to understand for learners. We turn corners and in a car we deliberately slow down to facilitate it. 

The road I live on is on a bit of an incline and when we used to ride our bikes with the kids, we would meander side to side coming down for a laugh. We weren't really turning and it was much the same shape as what we do on skis.

Maybe I'm getting too pedantic and a bit stir crazy with all this isolation but it's an interesting thought.

 


ReplyQuote
(@geepers)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 171
31/03/2020 2:42 am  
Posted by: @adrian_hamilton

Is turning used generally to mean just a change of direction or is it a more significant term in peoples' vocabulary?

Interestingly I know a number of people - including 3 with CSIA L2 cert - who are not able to leave cleanly carved railroad tracks. They always, always rotate the skis across the direction of travel. They are older skiers and after so many decades of actively rotating the skis can't seem to bring themselves to simply stand there letting the sidecut do the work.

I'm not convinced that a change of wording (direction change vs turning) is going to make much difference to that subset of skiers - be interesting to see. However, overall I like the concept - these days I tend to think of harnessing The Force to redirect CoM, like some sort of super power.  


ReplyQuote
(@adrian_hamilton)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 179
31/03/2020 1:04 pm  

The conceptual shift from turning the ski by twisting to facilitating it turning you (in simple terms) can be a really tough one for us older skiers. Motor skills can't be unlearned so these habits will always be there but I think with a commitment to some serious learning, these older skiers could actually have an advantage.

If they (we, as I am certainly one of them) can incorporate the concept while retaining the foundation skills then the toolbox will be pretty impressive.

There seems to be an obsession with carving and getting the hip as close to the floor as possible. It seems for many this high edge, low hip position is just that, a position and intention rather than the outcome of good mechanics balancing to higher forces with the intention of accelerating, maintaining speed, tightening an arc etc.

I feel a lot of skiers see carving as the only way to ski instead of one of many outcomes, albeit an important one. It definitely limits a skiers versatility and if the objective is to be a complete all mountain skier puts a ceiling on achievement.

Our National ski school in the UK, BASI, runs Level 1 courses on the indoor snow during Summer. I observe so many candidates, many of them racers, totally unable to carry out some of the basic skills as they are so one dimensional.

I read some time ago about how the Norwegian alpine coaches hone the skills of their young skiers with an emphasis on free skiing ahead of running gates. They are a nation of just over 5 million people for whom alpine skiing is a distant third Winter sport at very best and yet they continue to produce great skiers generation after generation.  


SkiNerd liked
ReplyQuote
(@skinerd)
Estimable Member Admin
Section 8 Coach
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 170
31/03/2020 9:28 pm  
Posted by: @adrian_hamilton

I feel a lot of skiers see carving as the only way to ski instead of one of many outcomes, albeit an important one. It definitely limits a skiers versatility and if the objective is to be a complete all mountain skier puts a ceiling on achievement.

Agreed, I've found in my own skiing, when I focus too much on high edge angles it can really mess with my ability to balance steer effectively.  


ReplyQuote
(@geepers)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 171
31/03/2020 11:48 pm  
Posted by: @adrian_hamilton

There seems to be an obsession with carving and getting the hip as close to the floor as possible. It seems for many this high edge, low hip position is just that, a position and intention rather than the outcome of good mechanics balancing to higher forces with the intention of accelerating, maintaining speed, tightening an arc etc.

Lot of spot-on comments in that post. There are entire ski blogs where a reader would come to the conclusion the only cool way to ski is to carve everywhere. Wonder what those posters think when watching WC racers stivot their way through a course? 

Also have a lot of time for @skinerd 's comments in P2P V3 - carving is the simplest way to ski. No multi-tasking. Just worry about the edging part of the equation.

Plus it is so much fun!


SkiNerd liked
ReplyQuote
Share:
Item added to cart.
0 items - $0.00
X