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(@jbruce)
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20/04/2020 4:29 pm  
Posted by: @adrian_hamilton

You can also do it as a hip drop and elevation standing with one foot on a step side on and the other overhanging the step.

I personally like the wobble board as it trains my lower side to be the weighted side, and the elevated side light -some sort of balance board automatically does this though the extent can vary obviously. If using a step, boards or books I think aiming to lift the high side onto the platform or attempting to float the high foot on top of the platform when the lower foot is planted will give similar results. 

In case anyone is wondering I'm using straight legs just to isolate the pelvis from any lower joint compensation to make it clear how mobile the pelvis is for L and R sides. Keeping the torso vertical over the pelvis just helps break some of the adhesions in our torso that contribute to blocking pelvis movement, or at least that is how it feels to me. By stacking, dropping or elevating shoulders it gives muscle memory for all joints stacked, as well as ensuring a range of motion past optimal, making it easier to be relaxed at optimal as well as having extra mobility for the odd Hail Mary move. 

Appreciate that anatomy link by the way, and he has a number of other videos I am curious about. For myself I have a few hip/ leg issues and if I do nothing in the preseason its like I have a 2x4 strapped to my side at the beginning of the season so links are appreciated.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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20/04/2020 6:39 pm  

I have become increasingly aware of the role the hips play in skiing movements and probably just about any other sport come to that. Without stability, mobility, flexibility and strength there we can’t hope to coordinate the movements we need.

This of course will also have a huge impact on teaching and of students/ clients limitations in performing actions that are beyond their physiological capability.

For me this reinforces the importance and value of having an understanding of how our bodies work: which bits do what and how to make them better at it.

 


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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24/04/2020 7:12 pm  

I said I'd report back on my quest to improve my medial femoral rotation. I have spent a week very intensively working on a range of exercises and over 2000 repetitions of one very simple exercise; standing and rotating the femur to its full range on each side.

I have foam rolled, mobilised, stretched and strengthened. The upshot is an improvement of 13 degrees on my blocked right leg. I had already had it established by a physio that the blockage was primarily soft tissue but I had been trying to make big changes for years with very little success.

This is a significant change and one that I believe will make some difference to my skiing, particularly short turns. 

It's just the start really as a week is too short a time to get where I want to. I still only have 50 degrees and want to achieve 70 degrees. It will take time but time is something we have in abundance at the moment.

Warren Smith, a very well respected coach and by the way big fan of the CSIA used me as a case study in a Webinar this morning which was really good. I've been in contact with him during the week and keeping him posted with photos and phone calls. Top bloke.

There's a broader point to this in my mind, which is that significant changes to anything, be it improving range of motion or improving some aspect of skiing requires a lot of work, time, dedication and accurate effective feedback.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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29/04/2020 2:51 pm  

I don't know what kind of training people do but for me being from a country with no big mountains and unreliable snow cover at the small Scottish centres, I try my best to get as fit as I can in order to optimise my limited time on mountain snow..

It seems to be something that a lot of good skiers, better than me, neglect which is surprising. I've heard people say they will ski themselves fit. Would they go into a football season (proper football that is, as played by Man United) without preparation and ongoing conditioning? They wouldn't dream of it. It actually quite irritates me that people wouldn't strive to be the best they can be. Anyway, that's my hobby horse.

In posting this thread, I was considering both movement patterns specific to skiing and ways of optimising the range of training components necessary for complete ski preparation.

For example, I look at exercises that are often put forward as great for ski preparation. A good example would be the goblet squat. It definitely has some merit as an exercise but when we work the legs bilaterally we recruit muscle groups quite differently to how we recruit them unilaterally. We work our legs unilaterally in our skiing movements. For that reason, I would only use bilateral squatting when I was, for example, recovering from injury and dialling in accurate, safe technique. 

I am also always very conscious of the tendency to train the areas that we're already quite good at and therefore usually find easier and perhaps more fun. For me, aerobic capacity has always been good, so going for long bike rides comes quite easy. My wife is a good swimmer, frustratingly much better than I am. She often defaults to going for a swim. Yet this kind of training has quite a small part to play in my ideal training plan.

With all the components I have identified as necessary, I can't fit my plan into a 1 week schedule building in adequate rest and recovery time. I have, therefore, opted for a 9 day programme. This lockdown has made my adherence to the plan very easy.

It  would be interesting to hear how others plan their fitness programmes.


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(@geepers)
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30/04/2020 7:43 am  

My training is increasingly affected by hip issues. It's a fine line between building some  strength/endurance vs aggravating soreness. Up until recently I could do any particular exercise with zero pain at the time but would pay some hours later.

Skiing is the only activity I have found that actually helps - everything gets stronger and less sore in the hips with more weeks of skiing. At the start of the season it can be uncomfortable to just sit on the lift. But by the end of a few weeks it's nearly all good. Some reduction in bump skiing seemed prudent so no more running bumps all day. 😦 

It seems best approach would be to ski 52 weeks per year but I'm having a hard time convincing the wife of such a treatment program. 🙄 


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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30/04/2020 9:19 am  

@geepers have you had it looked at? It sounds a curious one if skiing actually helps. If it's not an issue with the actual joint then my best guess would be it's to do with stability. I think that would be consistent with your experience.

Do you do any specific exercises for the gluteus medius? Have you had comments in the past about 'A' framing that weren't issues of technique or equipment? Obviously you won't be doing it now as you wouldn't have passed your L3 tech.

It would be interesting to see you squatting with a small load.

There are some really good glute med exercises that might help.


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(@geepers)
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30/04/2020 2:06 pm  

@adrian_hamilton Had a spike in pain levels recently so have gone the medical route. Cam type femoroacetabular impingements showed up and explain a great deal. Like problems associated with sitting for extended periods and why skiing, where the pelvis has a different tilt, is beneficial.

Physio is my vastly preferred approach and will know more next week.

Luckily the pain subsided - now spend very little time sitting. 


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