Notifications
Clear all

What's The Plan?

Page 1 / 8

(@adrian_hamilton)
Reputable Member Moderator
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 390
Topic starter  

The season is coming to an end. For some of us there was no skiing at all, while others have had what seems to be something approaching a normal season.

Maybe it's because I had no skiing that my thoughts are already very much looking towards next season and what I can do to prepare and plan but actually I really think it's the time to start thinking ahead, setting some goals and a plan as to how you can achieve them.

What do you want to add to your skiing next season to make progress towards your long term goals? How are you going to achieve this? What can you do to prepare physically to optimise your learning? How can you prepare psychologically to face the hurdles involved in the learning process? Is there any equipment you need to add to your locker?

I am well on the way with my plan. The way I see things, the longer I have to prepare, the better chance I have of achieving my goals. 

I would really like to hear your views and some of your ideas of what you're going to do. It may not be in your thinking or maybe be very much embryonic but it would be fun to start getting some ideas down and see how they develop over the months. We can maybe help each other with ideas and sharing goals is a powerful tool to keep you on track.

 


SkiNerd and gpatters liked
Quote
(@therealmrtall)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 107
 

TL;DR Focus on fitness and set up a ski training plan for next season.

Conditioning for next season. I have a gravel bike and I'm looking to add a mountain bike this spring to get me on the trails, work the legs and get the cardio up. Haven't mountain biked in 100 years, so I think I'll enjoy the fitness and fun of riding again. On the fitness note, I hope to dedicate time to a more ski-oriented training regime, probably dialed in/up toward the end of summer so there's at least a few months of dedicated training ahead of the next season. 

Learning over the summer months. Remain active on SkierLab and catch up on online content (e.g., the Whistler MA sessions on YouTube) just to keep things bouncing around in my head and improve my understanding.

Develop a training plan. Take advantage of private lessons early in the season, potentially in lieu of camps (depending on what's available). I'm confident in my on-piste technique and, although I still need to develop in this area, it's not a concern for me in terms of reaching a L3 goal. Bumps -- that's another story. I need to dial up bumps and off-piste skiing, so skiing steeper more challenging terrain and getting mileage in the bumps. I'm useless in bumps and at this point that's the major hurdle to jump. Given that I am a weekend warrior (save for a couple of weeks over holidays) I need to be efficient with my time when it comes to development. I feel like a focused plan will help, so at least one day each weekend I have a goal or objective to work on. I'm not sure what it should look like at this point, but I'll think about in the next little while and almost certainly create a thread to get some ideas.

 


gpatters and SkiNerd liked
ReplyQuote
(@adrian_hamilton)
Reputable Member Moderator
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 390
Topic starter  

Of course this thread is conditional on wanting to be the best you can be. It's not what everyone wants. If cruising greens and having a beer is what it's about then great but my thinking is that if your aim is to be the best you can be then control the things you can control.

I can't change the fact that I live in England (well I can't now anyway) and access to the mountains is a major undertaking and therefore my ski days are quite limited. I can't control weather, snow conditions when I get to the mountains. I can, however, control my fitness level. I have no excuse for not being fit enough. It doesn't take 6 weeks or even 6 months to 'get fit,' it's an ongoing process and I can always do more. That includes addressing my weaknesses more than playing to my strengths.

I've always had a pretty good engine, so for me doing lots of aerobic exercise isn't making best use of my time even though it's fun. I am fortunate in remaining fairly agile for an old bloke. The areas I really need to focus on are mobility/ flexibility(with some specific very deficient areas) and strength. There's an unavoidable reality that strength diminishes as we get older but we can minimise that with the right training.

Having indoor snow 20 miles away, which is due to reopen next week means I can address some technical aspects of my skiing which will prepare me as best as I can for when I finally get to the mountains. I have a very detailed plan evolving.

It might not sound very macho to confess to getting intimidated by certain situations but then I'm not very macho so I'm confessing. To minimise the impact I'm dedicating time to mental preparation.

We hear all the time how the top athletes in sport are all equally talented and physically prepared but that the most successful are the ones who are mentally the toughest. The reason for that may have some foundation in nature but these athletes also dedicate a huge amount of time and effort to preparing mentally. If it's good enough for Mikaela then it must be worth looking at.


Marcus and SkiNerd liked
ReplyQuote
(@skinerd)
Reputable Member Admin
Section 8 Coach
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 350
 

Well, the season officially ended here yesterday. I did have plans to be in Whistler for some CSIA work through April, but with WB shutting down and increased restrictions it looks like that’s the last of the snow sliding for me this year. Maybe a day or two of touring of if I’m lucky.

So what’s the plan? Good question!

I feel like age and lifestyle are starting to catch up with me and I can no longer get away with skiing myself into shape at the start of each season, if I want to up my game... which I do.

My main goal is to develop a bombproof back and try to sort out some of the asymmetries and muscles imbalances that have build up over time.   

I start work at the Bear Lodge at the end of the month. No tourists this summer do to COVID but we have a bunch of maintenance projects on the go such as trail building etc that should provide some pretty good physical labour. There is a small gym for staff and I’ve made a promise to myself to get in there as much as my body will handle to work on explosive power and core strength. My biggest challenge will be to improve flexibility and find the patience to stretch consistently.

Not sure what routines will look like yet but perhaps, I’ll update here once I figure that out.

 


ReplyQuote
(@adrian_hamilton)
Reputable Member Moderator
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 390
Topic starter  

Something that has resonated with me in a sports psychology book I'm reading was posing a question about goals. In my case the goal is to present for the Level 3 skiing exam next season, COVID permitting. The question that follows is ''Are you doing everything you can to achieve that goal?'' If the answer is no, then it's more of a daydream than a goal.

@skinerd you need to get that back sorted. I know what it's like. I almost feel like a hostage to mine and never know when I'm going to wake up in pain. It's been an issue for over 10 years now.

 


ReplyQuote
(@adrian_hamilton)
Reputable Member Moderator
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 390
Topic starter  

By the way if anyone is interested, the book is 'Training for Athletic Success' by Dr Jim Taylor. It's a great book in my opinion.


Marcus liked
ReplyQuote
(@therealmrtall)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 107
 
Posted by: @adrian_hamilton

By the way if anyone is interested, the book is 'Training for Athletic Success' by Dr Jim Taylor. It's a great book in my opinion.

@adrian_hamilton I was going to post a question about this very subject: recommended reading, but in particular sports psychology. I am hopeless in the bumps and I've mostly avoided them entirely. Honestly, I think half my problem is simply a total lack of confidence in that area. 

@SkiNerd Did you mention one or two ski technique books that are must-reads for ski geeks? Any other suggestions?


ReplyQuote
(@adrian_hamilton)
Reputable Member Moderator
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 390
Topic starter  

@therealmrtall another great book is 'The Pressure Principle' by Dave Alred.

The technique book that I would recommend to anyone and everyone is 'Ultimate Skiing' by Ron LeMaster.


ReplyQuote
(@therealmrtall)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 107
 
Posted by: @adrian_hamilton

'Ultimate Skiing' by Ron LeMaster.

@adrian_hamilton Ah that sounds familiar... thank you!


ReplyQuote
(@adrian_hamilton)
Reputable Member Moderator
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 390
Topic starter  

@therealmrtall the 3 books I have mentioned can be bought as kindle as well as in print on Amazon here in UK. I have Ultimate Skiing in both forms. 


ReplyQuote
(@geepers)
Reputable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 338
 

So a little different in the south - now waiting for the weather to continue cooling - some months to go before snow - and hoping for better conditions than last year. Be towards end of July before it's generally worth a trip.

The plan?

Fitness. Can be challenging these days with some hip issues. Fortunately the two things they responds to are skiing and landscaping. Now the hot weather has toned down it's time to ramp up the outdoor projects. Had an afternoon lifting turf which provided a good all round work-out.

On snow. Well, starting to look like the entire snow sport population of Australia has woken up to the fact that local resorts may be the only game accessible for some time. And we are all bursting for a slide. Obtaining a lift pass has become a competitive activity, only overshadowed by the difficulty of getting accommodation. This may turn out to be a season of very few actual days on snow...

If we do get any skiing will see if there's an opportunity for some filming and posting for feedback. Usual stuff - long turns, shorts, bumps. Will very much depend on which ski buddies score the same days. My gut feel is that there are unlikely to be enough days to make much progress and it will be a matter of limiting skill slippage.

Longer term - like next Canada winter - hopefully there's be at least some international travel But in our case it very much depends on successful vaccination programs for both countries. In Australia's case it is just not happening quickly enough. 


ReplyQuote
(@geepers)
Reputable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 338
 

Ultimate Skiing is essential reading for anyone interested in CSIA certification. That book is the foundation stone for 2 main new CSIA manuals - Physics of Skiing and Skills Framework.

For bumps it's hard to find as comprehensive a how-to as P2P V2. I re-watch before every ski season. Always find something new or that wasn't appreciated last time. Tom Gellie's BigPictureSkiing has additional information on bump skiing but it is absolutely not a starting point.


SkiNerd liked
ReplyQuote
(@therealmrtall)
Estimable Member Secret Snow Sliding Society
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 107
 

@geepers Thanks for the notes. Another summer read will be to get up to date on the latest CSIA material, plus some books if I can jam all that in. Nobody told this parenting thing would eat up all my time and energy! ? 

We had a decent season and from what I hear it was one of the best for the mountain and the local ski shop. We feel fortunate (and measurably more sane) having had the opportunity to slide around this year. Fingers crossed for your upcoming season! 

 

 

 


gpatters liked
ReplyQuote
(@skinerd)
Reputable Member Admin
Section 8 Coach
Science Friction Club
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 350
 
Posted by: @adrian_hamilton
Posted by: @adrian_hamilton

'Ultimate Skiing' by Ron LeMaster.

Yep, there’s lots of good books out there but that’s the one must read for any ski instructor.


ReplyQuote
(@adrian_hamilton)
Reputable Member Moderator
Science Friction Club
Section 8 Camper
Secret Snow Sliding Society
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 390
Topic starter  

We're back in the snowdome again. We had one session last Monday but it was Easter school holidays and the slope was very busy so we only did the one. We have 3 sessions booked for this coming week.

The first thing I'm looking to add to my skiing is to maintain some separation through to the end of the turn. I tend to lose it and square up which causes me some issues at transition.

I'm very much trying to make sure I work with external cues, not to the exclusion of internal cues but my recent reading and listening both to ski coaches and probably more so to sports psychologists, suggests the power of external cues.

The cue I worked with last week was to point my zipper towards the apex/ fall line of the next turn. I definitely felt some slight awkwardness doing this which was pleasing as it tells me I'm doing something different. 

I'm also trying to keep my skis turning underneath me more actively and again the mildly uncoordinated feedback was reassuring.

Tomorrow will be more of the same and maybe upping the performance a bit to test things out. I was sticking pretty much to IP last time.

One of my weaknesses in training is my desire to try too much. I'm always racing ahead in my mind and thinking of what's next. I have resolved to be more disciplined. It's not as easy to do indoors as in the mountain but it's the way I want to go.

With regard to our snowdome in Manchester, things were looking really bleak and I was concerned it wouldn't survive our most recent lockdown but in the last few weeks things have taken a turn for the better.

The 'Snowcentre' in Hemel Hempstead has bought Chill Factore in Manchester. This is excellent on so many levels. CFe was never run as a Snowsports centre but much more as a leisure experience. None of the management was from a snowsports background and the CEO had a background in theme parks. I don't think she actually knew it was cold inside.

Hemel has a reputation as a centre of snowsports excellence and they boast several Level 4s from the Irish and Canadian systems. The CEO is a snowsports man, so all is looking good and speaking to staff they sound very positive about the new direction.

So apart from the continuation of indoor snow within half an hour of my house, there is the prospect of it becoming a centre of excellence.

 

 


gpatters liked
ReplyQuote
Page 1 / 8
Share:
Item added to cart.
0 items - $0.00
X