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(@skinerd)
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@adrian_hamilton Inspiring… and a nice tribute to Al.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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I don't know if anyone has an opinion about the comment I made regarding Elan skis and the delta angle. It sounds pedantic I'm sure but I've found recently the difference a few layers of duct tape under the front of my boot baseboard has made. It probably all relates to limb length I would think.

I'm pretty sure I have a longish body and relatively shorter legs that create a need for me to be more flat on the ski. If the Elan skis still have this big delta angle then that might make for a challenge being balanced.

Otherwise the Amphibio 14TI and 16TI skis look good. I am still inclined towards the Head Rally or maybe Titan but I'm leaning more towards the Rally.


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(@skinerd)
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@adrian_hamilton I haven’t tried any Elans in the last 6 or 7 years, but all I’ve tried in the past have been really nice.

I’m not sure what sort of delta they’ve built into their binding system. I’ve experimented a fair bit with ramp and delta in my own skiing, and although a slight adjustment is immediately apparent in sensation, as long as it’s not to a huge degree, I find it pretty easy to adapt within a run or two and never really noticed much change in performance. For me, it mostly comes down to the forward lean of the boot cuff (which is easy to adjust). That said, many boot fitters are advocating a ‘flatter’ stance and I’m sure it has more effect on some people. 

Probably not a very helpful answer:)


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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Posted by: @skinerd

Probably not a very helpful answer:)

No on the contrary, it's all helpful. It's always difficult buying the right kit when it might be months before I get to see what they're really like. I've made a lot of mistakes.

I have to think also though that at your skill level adaptation is much easier than at my level. I know they did some tests on World Cup racers and their binding position and found that they adapted within a very short time where FIS level racers were noticeably hampered. I think the same or bigger gaps are at play between you and me. 

As you say I could adjust the boot cuff angle.

If I can sell the second pair of skis I'm selling on Ebay in time, I've found a great deal on the Heads, otherwise I'll look at the Elans maybe.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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I had such a great morning skiing this morning. I have been intending to attempt outside to outside hop turns, not just because they are now an element in the Level 3 but because they challenge so much; stance, pressure control, edging.

I started after warming up with simple outside ski turns holding the ski level. I found the cue for success here was to maintain tension in the feet and ankles and in the glute medius, particularly the raised leg. 

I then moved to improving ski performance using the same cues and having an additional external cue of creating a 'C' shape.

Once happy with ski performance, I started to concentrate on the transition and making sure there was only one ski in contact with the snow at any one time. This gradually progressed to a bit of a hop. This was the big challenge as I had to find the spot where I could hop which involved fore/ aft massively but also pressure control and using pressure to create the hop.

Gradually I was able to find some success hopping with both skis off the ground simultaneously. Surprisingly it was easier to hop off my right foot as my left foot turns are much stronger than my right footers. There's something in that for me to learn as well.

I found it to be quite demanding physically and stopped after about 1 1/4 hours of concentrated work by which time the slope was actually quite busy. We were going to just ski for a while but Cath was cold so we left but we're back in the morning.

I'm really excited by the outcome as I thought it would take way longer to get to the stage I'm at. Still a lot of work to do but actually a couple of friends, one being Paul from my blog, came over and complimented me on them.


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(@skinerd)
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@adrian_hamilton  Awesome… next step, edge to edge hops with no poles:)


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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There's a really good interview with Warren Jobbitt by Tom Gellie on the latest Global Skiing podcast. I have the podcasts downloaded to my Apple devices.

He talks about lots of stuff, his philosophy of skiing and teaching, his injury etc. It's well worth a listen.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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I read a book last week about training as we get older and how important it is not just for sport but for life in general to use resistance exercise and push ourselves. 'Ageless Strength, Strong and Fit for a Lifetime,' by Jeff Horowitz.

It's not such a great book and really was full of stuff I already knew but it did make a very important point and one I've been banging on about for years but have never heard anyone endorse. That is this notion of losing muscle mass as we age and also losing speed. I have always said that this should be phrased as losing 'potential' muscle mass. The saying presupposes that at our optimal muscle mass age, we were optimally trained.

Certainly when I was 30 or whatever the age is, I had 2 young kids to look after with a 3rd on the way, was in a job that was crazily stressful and was doing virtually no exercise. Even if I had been training, I had very little knowledge in those days.

We are said to lose 3% to 5% muscle mass per decade POTENTIALLY,  so I should in theory have lost anything from 10.5% to 17.5%. Given my circumstances then and my lack of understanding, I doubt I was more than 50% of my potential. Today I train strength on a regular basis and with way more understanding of how to train effectively and efficiently. Now I find that encouraging.

 


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(@geepers)
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@adrian_hamilton 

That point on aging makes sense. Have the opinion that it matters less how we currently compare with some theoretical peak (long past) and that the important thing is how well we can do at this stage of life. Which may be better (or not as good as) some previous stage.

Noting that I had a re-visit of a hip issue from when I acutely over-strained a few years ago. (Shouldn't try to play footy at full pace after decades away, even if it was a friendly no-tackle game.) It can be brought on by not allowing enough recovery time with a certain exercise. The trouble is picking which exercise as it's a chronic strain - doesn't hurt at all at the time and only reveals itself around 12-24 hours later.

Took a week off to allow plenty of time but now back in the swing of things.

Unfortunately we (Sydney) are back in covid lockdown so skiing not on the cards for the foreseeable future.

 


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