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Topic starter

This is probably typical of my IP a few days before assessment. At this time I was accentuating flex/extension throughout each turn attempting to eliminate a tendency to ski a fixed position after the fall line. I may have skied better (or worse) at the actual assessment.

Ok, fire at will.  

 

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Looks like you managed most of the objective criteria quite well on that slope... speed, turn shape etc. Of course the other half of the the battle is the technical criteria. 

You said you were working on trying to flex more as you steer across the fall line. May I ask which joint/body part you were trying to flex?  

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Topic starter

 What joint/body part was I trying to flex? Isn't it obvious?  ?

And of course it isn't. My main focus on that run was exaggerated extension/flex, especially the knees/hips whilst keeping the ankles mobile. It felt like I was flexing and extending so much that it would stand out like a huge up/down movement on the vid. That can be seen in places - like the transition at the 15, 17, 20, 22.5, 25 and 27.25 second marks where I go from bent knees/hips to straighter - but, gee, it's much less than I thought. (The last couple of turns where the figure is bigger aren't much use as by then I was mostly focused on not hitting the camera-person who was my wife as I'd never hear the end of that!)

Note: I have a script that allows practically unlimited zoom in, and step forward/back on 1/10 sec intervals on the original mp4 file. Saves going cross-eyed trying to see the tiny stick figure on youtube... 

At the time of filming the extension was still happening too rapidly and I was still flexing too early with not enough left after the fall line.  

That run is Sting off the Sunburst chair - same pitch we used for assessment. It's marked a black which is probably a bit charitable.

 

 

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It’s quite difficult to see to be honest on my screen geepers but one thing that seems to be happening is that you are using all your range pretty instantly instead of it being progressive through the turn. That means there’s nothing left, inhibiting your ability to manage pressure or influence the turn. Like I say it’s very distant and in the lower turns is less obvious but that’s just something I think is there.

Hi Adrian,

I think that's a spot on comment re too much too early.

Related to tech point 4 I've been attempting to change the movement pattern so the extension happens much more evenly (transition to fall line) and then flex gradually from fall line to transition. Ran out of season. ? 

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Sorry, I got carried away with scrutinising the distant image. I also see really good rhythm and rounded arcs.

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Posted by: geepers

 What joint/body part was I trying to flex? Isn't it obvious?  ?

And of course it isn't. My main focus on that run was exaggerated extension/flex, especially the knees/hips whilst keeping the ankles mobile. It felt like I was flexing and extending so much that it would stand out like a huge up/down movement on the vid. That can be seen in places - like the transition at the 15, 17, 20, 22.5, 25 and 27.25 second marks where I go from bent knees/hips to straighter - but, gee, it's much less than I thought. (The last couple of turns where the figure is bigger aren't much use as by then I was mostly focused on not hitting the camera-person who was my wife as I'd never hear the end of that!)

Note: I have a script that allows practically unlimited zoom in, and step forward/back on 1/10 sec intervals on the original mp4 file. Saves going cross-eyed trying to see the tiny stick figure on youtube... 

At the time of filming the extension was still happening too rapidly and I was still flexing too early with not enough left after the fall line.  

That run is Sting off the Sunburst chair - same pitch we used for assessment. It's marked a black which is probably a bit charitable.

 

 

@geepers I agree there are some timing issues with regards to flexion extension... but before we get into a technique tug of war and I try to fix something that may not have been broken, I guess a better question to ask is WHY are you trying to flex and extend more?

Flexing and extending various joints at various times will affect things in a lot of different ways. So with regards to the ski's interaction with the snow, what are you hoping to achieve from these movement patterns? I guess I'm just trying to determine the intentions behind the feedback you were given. 

For example: Are you trying to flex/extend to move fore/aft so your feet so your feet support you and the pressure is directed through the middle of the ski? Are you trying to move vertically to increase or decrease pressure at a certain part of the turn? Are you trying to flex/extend on one side of the body to move laterally and control edge grip?

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Topic starter

Primarily to stay mobile in the lower joints.

Then manage pressure through the lower half of the turn, depending on snow conditions. Less flex required for hero snow (plenty of grip), more flex when less grip.

Trying to keep fore/aft balance independent of the amount of flex/extension. Slightly forward early (shin contact) and moving back to feel the arch of the heel.

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You probably don't need a tonne of flexion to manage 'pressure' in these sorts of turns so my assumption was that your feedback had more to do with a change in fore/aft balance. Of course I'm just speculating.

In the video, where you are actively trying to increase mobility, it looks to me like more of the flexion is happening at the knees moving the balance just slightly aft on the ski (which is quite different from your short turns). Try to add a little more bend in the hips to stayed centered (might feel like you're keeping your shoulders over your knees. 

I would also suggest allowing the inside leg to continue bending like it is but resist a little more with the outside leg. This will move your hips inside the arc rather than down, increasing the edge and tightening the arc while allowing you to maintain strength against the increasing forces in that part of the turn. 

With regards to timing, I agree with the above comments that both the extension and the flexion come a touch early which is contributing to the fore/aft imbalance. If you think of flexing the downhill leg to release the arc and initiate the transition that might solve the early extension... and sometimes I find counting through the turn (eg. 1,2,3,4) and resisting until you reach 3 or 4 often does the trick.

You probably won't be able to think about all those things at once so perhaps just play with one variable at a time and see how the skis react.

By the way, I'm being pretty picky here. I actually think these turns are pretty close to meeting the standard. Good luck @geepers

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Topic starter

Thanks for all that input, skinerd. Will work on that for the next attempt.

This does highlight one little peeve I have with the CSIA assessment. On the teaching side I have two detailed reports - one from each assessor - from my 60 minute 'lesson' that outline issues and opportunities for improvement. On the skiing side I have 4 numbers. It would be great to some qualitative feedback on the skiing built into the system.

(To be fair the CSIA system probably works better if the Advanced Training module - which provides comments but no numbers - is taken just before the Assessment. Of course that means there's not a lot of time to refine any AT input.)   

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Happy to help Geepers!

BTW, that's not the first time I've heard that comment regarding feedback on skiing exams. Infact, I just heard it twice last week.

Unfortunately, it's not really practical the way things are scheduled, especially for bigger exams. Sometimes you have 30 or more candidates in a ski off and you have about 30 seconds to score a run. I suppose you could break it up into smaller groups each with their own examiner, but I think the current process eliminates personal biases and makes it more fair for the candidates with the final mark being the average of all the course conductors scores rather than just one.

I must admit, it's much more gratifying to teach a course or module, where feedback in constructive, than it is to do exams. I don't know too many course conductors who enjoy handing out envelopes without pins in them:(

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It’s really helpful to read the feedback. It makes me realise how much more I have to improve my eye and my understanding. I’m guessing the advanced teaching module would be helpful in that regard. It’s the old story; the more you learn, the more you realise there is to learn.

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Keep working geepers, that Level 3 pin is pretty close for you.

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If I ever get a decent video, I’ll try and summon up the courage to post. I have several videos this season of the inside of rucksacks. My wife hasn’t got the hang of the camera.

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Posted by: adrian_hamilton

If I ever get a decent video, I’ll try and summon up the courage to post. I have several videos this season of the inside of rucksacks. My wife hasn’t got the hang of the camera.

I thought Nigel was the only one who shot the inside of camera bags on a regular basis;)

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Topic starter

He he... also have many, many minutes of footage of the inside of a pocket. At least in the digital age we can just delete - betcha Warren Miller was less than pleased in the days of expensive 8mm.

The two CSIA modules, Advanced Training and Advanced Teaching, are a big help for teaching skills however they are very short (3 day, 2 day respectively). My guess is that it takes quite some time to develop the necessary eye for detail. Hopefully we'll see some more vids and feedback that will assist.

The 'students' for the assessment teach will be the other candidates and they'll typically be good skiers with subtle issues. We had one young guy in our Advanced Teach who was an absolutely standout skier, head and shoulders above every other L3 candidate. (He passed his L3 skiing with a bunch of 8s and a 9 for the bumps. At the awards the L4s commented that he was an inspiration to watch.) A bit of a nightmare to have to build a lesson around.

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