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Topic starter

Situation:

  • Groomed, moderate blue run - is used for the L3 AP ski-off
  • Couple of cm fresh on a firm base, bit clumped up by traffic
  • Snowing

Objectives:

  • Advanced, consistent speed
  • 3 cat tracks wide
  • Rounded turn shape
  • Attempt to show some ski performance

Thoughts please.

8 Answers
1

I was waiting for Skinerd but I'll have an input anyway.

Before anything else, if that's traffic you may not appreciate skiing in Europe quite so much as Canada.

You have certainly completed your objectives and this looks really nice skiing. One thought from me is that you seem to maybe get into a position of separation and angulation quite high in the arc. For me this looks a bit like an intention rather than an outcome.

I think you would get better ski performance if your angulation was a response to pressure building, so a bit more incremental.

It's a little difficult to see but it looks like you already have quite a bit of separation at the fall line, whereas I would prefer to see you pretty much aligned at the fall line.

I can see how you passed L3 though, good work.

 

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Posted by: @geepers

2. Keeping shoulders parallel to the slope. This is a cue to help maintain balance over the outside ski and increase hip angulation through the turn. As the load increases it certainly feels as if I'm flexing more at the knee/ankle/hip however that's not what the vid shows. I expect what I'm feeling is the need to more strongly resist the increasing forces rather than actually increasing flex.

The shoulders remain nice and level, however, it's possble that this focus could also lead to hip dumping if you're thinking about it right at the top of the arc. I suspect that might be the case in this video. There is a lot of mass in the hips so ironically too much angulation there can lead to getting caught on the inside ski.

I struggle with this myself at times... It's a fine balance! 

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Topic starter

"The shoulders remain nice and level, however, it's possible that this focus could also lead to hip dumping if you're thinking about it right at the top of the arc. I suspect that might be the case in this video. There is a lot of mass in the hips so ironically too much angulation there can lead to getting caught on the inside ski."

Doing a quick side by side at similar points in the turn I think I see what you mean.

1. From transition...

2. ... to top of the arc, I'm already well inside and angulated, skinerd has barely inclined, angulation started

3....skinerd still waiting, I'm already max lateral range

4.  ...skinerd increasing inclination and angulation, I'm now laterally static (no, it's not the same screen capture but it may as well be...)

5. ... skinerd now maximum, inside hand almost on the snow, inside hip low, inside knee up and clearing. I'm...ah... stuck. 

6. ...skinerd already looking for the exit. I'm going to hang here a while longer...

7. ... skinerd so done with that last turn vs let's traverse some more 🙂

 

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Ooooh I must have missed this while in transit back from Mexico.

Nice turns @Geepers...

Seeing as you're so nicely achieving what you set out to do, I'm going to throw a little challenge out there. See if you can load the skis a bit more progressively through the bottom half of the arc a to create more momentum across the slope between turns.

How to achieve this? I agree with Adrian's Assessment. If you keep the pelvis aligned with the outdside foot a little more through the top part of the arc, you'll create a strong platform and maintain a better ability to direct the skis throughout the turn. A focus on using the foot rolling move to create the inital grip might facilitate this. Then save that beautiful separation/hip angulation for the bottom half of the arc and it will likely rocket you across the slope.

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Topic starter

Thanks for the feedback, Adrian and Skinerd. I agree that it would be better if the angulation came in more progressively. Looks somewhat park n ride atm.

I'm attempting to consolidate and refine a number of actions into the turns:

1. Maintaining solid contact between shin and front of the boot - the L4 who I did the most days with this season says if the boot is not being flexed then we're probably too far back. Still wants us to still feel pressure build at the heel. Been feeling the heel for some time and since adopting that internal cue of more solid shin contact have spent much less time back off balance.

2. Keeping shoulders parallel to the slope. This is a cue to help maintain balance over the outside ski and increase hip angulation through the turn. As the load increases it certainly feels as if I'm flexing more at the knee/ankle/hip however that's not what the vid shows. I expect what I'm feeling is the need to more strongly resist the increasing forces rather than actually increasing flex.

3. Inside foot placement (tucked back and in) by maintaining shin/boot contact and rolling the inside leg in and up.

2nd item was the focus on this run.

Will try your points next time on snow. Also, would inside out turns be useful? I find they do give me that feel of being accelerated across the hill. Similarly slippy-grippy turns (JFB's drift turns).  

   

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With regard to foot placement, I think this is a real key to high level skiing. When I watch Skinerd in videos, everything is stacked right through the turn giving him balance and most importantly access to all the joints.

It's a huge issue for me and one I am aware of much of the time. I think I have it dialled in then see video of AP in particular and realise I haven't.

It's hard to see in your video and you are definitely at a more refined stage than me but I do see in the right turn at 8 seconds and the left at 15 a bit of a trailing leg; getting behind you and overflexed at the ankle. At that point you are losing optimal access to the joints. Again it's hard to see for sure but I think I see you getting a bit inside to compensate, characterised by a slight divergence of the skis.

The pulling back of the inside ski is a good way to address it I think and feeling stacked over that outside ski through the arc so your structure is supporting you. 

I would take this into some easy terrain and really focus on the skis being level with any tip lead being purely functional: build speed and performance gradually and only as your awareness allows. If you lose the awareness of your foot placement, take it back a notch again until you build the awareness.

You could stop this video at any point and see the kind of stacking I am referring to. I did at 9, 11 and 23 seconds. The feet are always aligned with the forces and supporting the structure. It allows him to do whatever he wants to with the turn as he is balanced to the forces.

@adrian_hamilton

Agree on the inside foot. Still consolidating.

Hard to consciously focus on too many things in any single run. Generally I'll choose one, maybe two cues. That run was a shoulders focus and in a way I'm surprised the inside foot doesn't spend even more time out front!

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A couple of things that might also help with this would be on gentle terrain to ski on the footbed feeling yourself very much stacked rather than relying on the front of the boot but still with contact. Another might be to try some outside ski turns either just releasing the camber of the inside ski or lifting it but being very much aware of your stacking, again on the footbed.

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I like this photomontage comparison. There are some really interesting comparisons here. 

I think we can learn from photos, always keeping in mind that they capture just a moment. When I did the Advanced Teaching module just before the exam, we were looking over the Science in Skiing booklet and our coach said one of his biggest take aways from the whole book was the 3rd image at the top of page 15. It provides a strong visual cue. It's that return to neutral. The first image of Skinerd captures the same moment. I try to use it as an image cue for where I want to pass through at that point of the turn, making sure it doesn't become a position but rather a point in motion.

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