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SAJ technique tip.


(@skierjohan)
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I found this skiing is kind of standard in Japan for controlling ski on steep slope.

 

Part 1, keeping high waist.

2, charging the power and prepare for the next turn.

3, moving forward.

This topic was modified 7 months ago 2 times by skierhiroshisan

(@adrian_hamilton)
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skierhiroshisan thanks Johan, I really like this video. You can definitely see the skiing style of the Tech Championships in there. I still don't know if that high outside hand is stylisitc or functional. Also the short turns look very different to the long ones.

I love the format of the video. Walking through manoeuvres is something that might be well incorporated into a lot of teaching. I remember seeing several videos of Richie Berger doing it on snow. It's a great way of initiating some movement patterns I think. I also like the demonstrations of bad examples as well. 

 


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(@skierjohan)
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@adrian_hamilton

I also love seeing bad examples. It seems most ski videos on the net mainly demonstrate skiing and what to forcus. If you ski in Hakuba Happo One, you will see a lot of people who spreads their arms and ski same way, that's because how they instruct and people just imitate coaches instruct.

About arm thing you mention, it's kind of balancing and also guiding? which direction he is moving forward.


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(@geepers)
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Good post @skierjohan !! Excellent info although somewhat limited as don't speak Japanese.

Can you confirm if my understanding is correct:

Point #1

Judging aspects of fore/aft balance from posture at key points in the turns.

1. Around transition how much of the thighs are visible (from the front view) as an indication of knee flex.

2. At apex whether the angle of the shin and the angle of the upper body (side view) are the same.

The correct example is matching shin/body angle from the right amount of knee flex

The bad example is skiing with excessive knee flex resulting in the skier being too back throughout the turn.

Point #2

Angulation and separation. I think there must be some commentary here about timing of inclination, angulation and separation through the turn??

The bad example is skiing with plenty of inclination but little angulation indicated by large  amount of shoulder tilt.

Another bad example is no separation of upper and lower body - in fact there's rotation of upper body into the turn at turn initiation and over-rotation during the turn.

Another bad example is the upper body being held too vertically and then dropping the hips inside without the body being supported by the centripetal forces of the turn. The shoulders remain level however an a-frame opens between the lower legs made worse by over-separating - hips left facing too square to the hill.

Walking drill at end of this section: what are they pointing out with the yellowed areas? I take it they are indicating the timing of angulation (increasing later in the turn) and using the position of the arm as a prompt to the skier (and a visual guide for the observer). Is this correct?

Training - I am unsure of the aim of the outstretched arms. To assist inclination? To help timing of angulation?

Point #3

Separate paths taken by skis and body? Direction skis and body face throughout the turn?

In the bad examples it all seems to turn as one and skiers are too far back (1st example) and then too far forward (2nd example).

The ground drill: importance of projecting the body forward into the new turn?

Training - is the key jumping perpendicular to the pitch?

 

I suspect I could be have a bad understanding in a lot of areas with what they are saying in the vid. Be great if you could clear up some of the points. ? 

 

@adrian_hamilton - there's a point Tom Gellie has made a couple of times in his vids about that old inside arm going out and then up. He points out that Ligety uses that as do other racers and that it helps with the timing of the lateral rotation and initially slows it down. (Moving mass further out will slow rotation due to conservation of angular momentum - ice skaters throwing their arms out and then in to slow and speed spinning.) I suspect that the Japanese are doing it for other reasons related to inclination and then timing of angulation. It looks like it is decorative but I think it has a very functional purpose.

BTW I really like the short turns in this vid.


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(@skierjohan)
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@geepers

Gpatters, I will follow up.


Point 1, Well done! You got what exactly part 1 is. Additional information is about hip position. Here in Japan, 4:30 and 10:30 is somehow called Turn max (during turn, apex?).
Also, it's not bending turns. You see that he puts pressures on is skis and also at transition, pressure is still on skis.
I translate Japanese comment to English now.
The advantage of high waist position is that results to having mental margin of next turn and also controlling turn shape under high speed.

 

Point 2
I simply translate to Japanese comment. Around 5-6 and 11-12 o;clock, the advantage is to accelerate, keeping rhythm, be able to ski nice Section 8, continuous round turns.
The walking drill yellow box, imaginary blow up balloon with Underarms/Armpits/Sides as long as using the body like a bow.
The last part of walking drill kinda over-action, but getting used to putting pressure on the skis and recharging for the next turn.


Point 3

This part is mainly focusing on moving COM? to forward (next turn centre).
This is kind of Japanese way? I mean, our skis ski to arc to arc, also our COM also moves to center of turn to turn on.
Probably you understand this way. If you use a compass to draw a circle, the main needle is our body. The drawing part of circle is our skis. Somewhere I heard that here in Japan.
Therefore, skiing, the centre of circle needle moves to turn to turn.

About this part, Skinerd or someone can tell if how they instruct is same or not.

This post was modified 7 months ago by skierhiroshisan

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(@geepers)
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@skierjohan

thanks for that reply.

For Point 1 I'm not fully understanding the advantages of the high waist.

  • Mental margin of the next turn - is that to do with seeing or mentally preparing or something else?

The other two points i think I understand.

Thanks.


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(@skierjohan)
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@geepers
Having high waist position, it has 2 advantage, 1 is being able to put pressure on the ski as early as possible. 2 is being able to control turn shape and also speed, I think it's called mobility in English.
I am sure that you know how bending (vending) turn is. At the transition, distance between COM and ski is closest.
I wondr how skinerd says about high waist advantage.


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(@skinerd)
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To be honest I wasn’t quite sure what was meant by high waist position, but I gather from this video it just means keeping a fairly long leg for support against a loaded ski.

Which I agree is very important if you want to resist any substantial amount of force.


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(@geepers)
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This is related to my comment on the latest Warren Jobbitt vid regarding transitions.

Learning to be patient whilst the inclination builds at the top of the turn. Over-riding the reptilian mind's basic desire to get stable and safe when the mammalian mind wants to have fun!

 

Thanks for the reply @skierjohan - that now all makes sense.


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