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(@skinerd)
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20/12/2019 9:17 pm  

Q-Corner is a new section in development for the Secret Snow Sliding Society. I'm hoping to create some videos giving cues that work for specific moves. I need your help brainstorming some ideas.

Got a cue that worked for you? Perhaps an internal sensation, something you observed or just a new way to think about something that helped you develop a skill and achieve a desired outcome. 


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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20/12/2019 9:25 pm  

Pulling the toes up against the top of the boot to engage the tibialis anterior and help to get the ankles working is one I really like. It's been a help in my own skiing but I think more so in my teaching. It really helps to get skiers out of the backseat and start to use the whole ski.


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(@jarred-brink)
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21/12/2019 2:03 am  

I struggle with "hip dumping" or whatever term you'd like to call it (essentially dropping the hips too early in the turn to create edge angle). Even when I feel like I've done a really good run and think that I'm staying stacked at the start of the turn when the video camera comes out and video analysis is done, sure enough, my hips drop in.

Now I'm not sure if this counts as an internal cue but here is something that has given me a nice visual cue to think about when I ski on whether or not hip dumping occurs: stand next to a wall with roughly a hands length between the wall and your hip. Now lean you hip all the way so that it's touching and resting against the wall. Notice how your feet have rolled onto what would be the edges if we had skis on? Now stand back up and instead of leaning your hips towards the wall, rotate your femur bone so that your knees move toward the wall. Notice how we now have edge angle, but our center of mass has stayed in the center? 

To me, it's a nice and clear way to visualize the two different moves one might use to initiate a turn. 


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(@geepers)
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22/12/2019 10:22 am  

A new way of thinking that helped me was imaging the pitch about to be skied is lined with mini-trampolines laid over on their side and arranged down the hill so that each turn is into a trampoline that redirects me back towards the center and on to the next trampoline - left, right, etc, down the hill.

Made me realise that there wasn't much spring in my 'trampolines'  - and of course to discover how to generate it.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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22/12/2019 4:20 pm  

I think quite a similar and complementary concept is viewing the turn as going from apex to apex rather than from top to bottom.


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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23/12/2019 2:54 pm  

2 cues which I have found really good came directly from Skinerd on the Autumn (fall) performance camp in Hintertux.

1. Push off the first metatarsal head at initiation.

2. Positively engage the gluteus medius on the outside leg through the turn. This creates power and stability.

I wasn't really able to perform anything much on the course as my back was so bad. I shouldn't really have been skiing at all and was skiing terribly, but I've been experimenting on the indoor snow and finding both cues really beneficial.


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(@skinerd)
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24/12/2019 8:03 am  

All great... thanks for posting guys. Keep me coming!


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(@adrian_hamilton)
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24/12/2019 7:44 pm  

Something I have been surprised at is the effectiveness of focusing on solidifying the core. This is most important and beneficial at the point of highest pressure, so depending on the type of turn and the skier making it, somewhere from the fall line onwards.

One cue I have come across that I like is to pull in the belly button and hold a fart.

Another I like even more is to use a sharp exhalation anticipating this point. It's why tennis players shout when they serve. The core solidifies and maximum power is available as the extremities (limbs) can move freely around the foundation of the core.


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(@geepers)
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26/12/2019 9:52 pm  

I always thought that tennis shriekn 'n gruntn was more about disrupting the opponent's concentration than doing anything for the ball striker. Maybe have to try it for each bump next mogul run. In which case should it be Sharapova scream or the Nadal moan? 😀  

Got to agree that activation of the core is important. JFB's cue is a good one.

Just revisiting @jarred-brink post above re rolling the femurs into the turn... Does anyone have a preference for leading this with either the new inside or new outside leg? Does "raise little toe" on the outside foot, "raise big tow" on the inside foot figure in anyone's cues?   


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(@skinerd)
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06/01/2020 6:30 pm  

@geepers

I think it’s a matter of preference but I most often I tend to focus on the inside leg leading the direction and edge angle and just feeling balance on the outside foot.


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(@geepers)
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08/01/2020 3:59 am  

@skinerd

That's interesting. It fits with "inside decider, outside rider" and the PMTS obsession that everything must start with the inside (if I understand them correctly).

Need to try this on snow.


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(@skinerd)
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08/01/2020 10:15 pm  

@geepers

I can't say for certain from a biomechanical persective that "everything must start with the inside" as there are a lot of different ways to skin a cat, but it has always resonated well with me. Certainly bending a leg to remove support from that foot triggers the mass to topple and creates inclination... which arguably could be the most important move in skiing. 


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(@geepers)
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09/01/2020 3:08 am  

@skinerd

Yes, we are all built a little differently and have differences in neural wiring (for want of a better term). And of course it depends where we are on the development path.

Watched a JFB vid on the gravity drop last night. May have seen it before (or something similar)  however this time with your phrase "...inside leg leading the direction and edge angle and just feeling balance on the outside foot..." (JFB says pretty much the same words) I think I have a better handle on it. Heck, it's probably in P2P V3 and I just haven't noticed it yet....

How this translates on snow will be interesting. Last season I worked a lot on inside foot placement. Whenever I thought about leading with the inside leg that ski would go off and to it's own thing. Which tells me that balance over the outside ski isn't all it needs to be.

Just on 2 weeks to go...


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